Mediaplanet What is Canada doing in terms of courting top talent to advanced manufacturing careers?

Steve Prahalis There is a global talent shortage in manufacturing and Canada is no exception. A majority of Canadian workers and companies have identified a lack of access to skilled workers as a major issue facing the Canadian workforce. With baby boomers retiring, and fewer young people going into manufacturing careers, it is essential that manufacturers take action if they do not want to see productivity decreases or lost business opportunities. Employers invest in equipment, tooling, and materials but often neglect to make similar investments in their employees. Investing in internal training or apprenticeship programs are two reliable methods for Canadian manufacturers to address the talent shortage.

MP Why is continuous learning so important to remaining competitive?

SP Studies show that a key variable in driving a company’s competitiveness is access to talented workers. A well-trained workforce is a competitive advantage for manufacturers, allowing companies to drive innovation, customer satisfaction, quality, and productivity. The beneficial byproducts are engaged and loyal employees, satisfied stakeholders, and a prosperous economy.

“Employers invest in equipment, tooling, and materials but often neglect to make similar investments in their employees.”

Additionally, innovation and advancements in manufacturing technology are moving rapidly. For professionals and companies to remain competitive in the manufacturing industry, they must keep pace with those changes. While technical innovation can provide great opportunity for companies, it can be a challenge for workers unable to master the constantly changing skills, leading to unfilled jobs.