Toronto Pearson International Airport

Business travellers passing through Toronto Pearson International Airport are finding an effective alternative to time lost while waiting for flights. Unlike so many other transportation hubs — where charging spots, quiet working areas, and reasonable places to eat (the choices usually being frenetic fast food or 5-star restaurants) are scarce — Toronto Pearson International places world-class travel comforts within reach of the average business traveller.

"The Toronto Pearson International gate area brings the best elements of the airport to the traveller."

According to Canada-based Monica Hailstone, Regional Director of the Americas for the Association of Corporate Travel Executives, this common sense approach provides business travellers with options that convert the hours between flights from wasted time into constructive intervals, with a minimum of airport anxiety.

“The Toronto Pearson International gate area brings the best elements of the airport to the traveller,” says Hailstone. “This state-of-the-art area offers iPad-type tablets for each individual. The WiFi connections are fast if you want to use your own equipment, and charging stations are also free.”

Hailstone points out that the international terminal also provides food options that are anxiety-free. “Travellers can call up a menu on the tablet screen and choose among a number of healthy choices, pay for them with a credit card, and have them brought to their seat by a server.”

“Business travellers constantly have one eye on the clock,” says Hailstone. “They’re straining to hear the one announcement that pertains to their flight, in a litany of garbled statements broadcast throughout the airport. Even the most seasoned business traveller gets a little edgy toward flight time.” Patrons of the Toronto Pearson International terminals can key their flight info into the tablets, which then monitor flight status, making sure travellers get their food in a timely fashion.

“Travellers never find themselves scrambling for a cheque after their flight is called,” says Hailstone.

The Vancouver International Airport

The Vancouver International Airport has taken a slightly different approach. There, each terminal building celebrates “the journey of land, sea, and sky” through unique representations of British Columbia’s cultural heritage and natural beauty. On a recent arrival from the US, Hailstone passed through a corridor designed to give travellers the experience of a great northwest forest.

"This unexpected environment gave the impression that you had arrived in a place different from all others."

“The sights, the sounds, and visual effects were remarkable,” says Hailstone. “The typical droning of the airport was replaced by the calls of birds and other forest life. This unexpected environment gave the impression that you had arrived in a place different from all others.”

The Vancouver International Airport is host to exhibitions by world-renowned artists like Bill Reid, whose work The Spirit of Haida Gwaii, the Jade Canoe welcomes travellers from around the world. Seventy-five contemporary sculptures from the Lorne Balshine collection, recording the oral Inuit history of wildlife, survival, and family beliefs, are also on exhibit at the airport.