As you drive from Borden-Carleton to Clyde River along Prince Edward Island's South Shore, jagged red sandstone cliffs spill down the coast, marking the boundary between land and sea. Off in the distance, local fishing boats circle the inner harbour, checking their traps for the day's catch—lobsters, crabs, halibut, salmon, mussels and oysters, all to be delivered fresh to the Island's many restaurants and markets, a testament to the region's reputation as a seafood lover's paradise.

Outdoor adventure

With over 43,000 kilometers of diverse coastline dotted with mountains, forests and plains, many who visit Atlantic Canada are struck by the sheer number of outdoor activities.

“On Cape Breton Island, Nova Scotia, the world-famous Cabot Trail offers stunning scenery, wildlife viewing, and a bounty of activities.”

Take Prince Edward Island for example. With over 30 golf courses to boot, including some of the top-rated courses in North America, it's easy to understand why the Island is the number one golfing destination in Canada. Whether you're a beginner, regular, or dreaming of turning professional, Prince Edward Island has the right course for you.

For adventure seekers, there are a total of nine national parks in Atlantic Canada, each affording its own unique pleasures to holidaymakers. On Cape Breton Island, Nova Scotia, the world-famous Cabot Trail offers stunning scenery, wildlife viewing, and a bounty of activities, including sea-kayaking, canoeing, yoga on the beach, biking, and, of course, warm-water swimming.

Beautiful scenery

500 kilometers or so south-west of Cape Breton Island, where the lower edge of New Brunswick meets the Bay of Fundy, the colossal power of the sea is demonstrated twice daily when over 100 billion tonnes of seawater flow in and out of the bay with each tide cycle. At Hopewell Rocks, visitors can walk on the ocean floor at low tide, and kayak up to 50 feet higher at the same spot just six hours later.

Across the Gulf of St. Lawrence, on the neighbouring island of Newfoundland, visitors and locals gather on the north-eastern coast from May to early-July to watch 10,000-year-old icebergs drift south in the Labrador current. These mountains of ice range in colour from snow white to deep aquamarine.

“For those seeking isolation, there are a total of nine national parks in Atlantic Canada, each affording its own unique pleasures to holidaymakers.”

Urban Atlantic Canada

While Atlantic Canada's natural exploits are among the best in Canada, the region is also famous for its vibrant and historical urban areas. Take Halifax, for instance, the seaport capital of Nova Scotia. Visitors can stroll Halifax’s waterfront boardwalk past historic sites, shops, restaurants and attractions, and learn the stories of the more than one million immigrants, refugees, war brides and evacuee children who arrived in Canada through Halifax at the Canadian Museum of Immigration at Pier 21.

In nearby St. John’s, Newfoundland & Labrador, downtown George Street boasts the most bars and pubs per square foot of any street in North America. It's a great place to meet locals, listen to music and enjoy a refreshing pint of beer after a long day walking the city's streets.

Whether you have three days or thirty, there's plenty to do and see in Canada's Atlantic region.